View the Eclipse Safely – 4 Easy Ways

Erika Swafford Creative Adventures 0 Comments

As a nature photographer, I’m very excited to watch the eclipse. I won’t be photographing the event this round because I want to see it with my own eyes first. Here are a few ways you can watch this amazing cosmic event, too.

Hands down, the eclipse glasses are the best way to view the eclipse. But if you don’t have them, there are several other options to still watch the magic happen. I found 4 ways that won’t damage your eyes. I decided to try them out so you can see how it would work.

4 Easy Ways to View the Eclipse - click here: http://erikaswafford.com/eclipse-safely/

View the Eclipse with Paper Plates

First, there is the paper plate method. You could use any other kind of card board but paper plates I’m sure paper plates are much easier to find and less work than cutting up a cereal box. This method has the added bonus of being able to use it to have a snack party after the eclipse!

If found that the size of the “sun” was rather tiny using this method but it would do in a pinch.

View the Eclipse with Paper Plates - click here: http://erikaswafford.com/eclipse-safely/

Check out this link for details on how it’s done:
https://www.timeanddate.com/eclipse/make-pinhole-projector.html

View the Eclipse with a Box

Second, there’s the pinhole box method. This one sounded like so much fun I had to try it! I like this one over the paper plates because you can block some of the extraneous light with the box and the “sun” is bigger. Out of all the methods I tried (besides the eclipse glasses) this one is my favoriate. Granted, it probably looks funny to have a box over your head but it’s worth it!

Here’s the view from the pinhole box I made:

View the Eclipse with a Box - click here: http://erikaswafford.com/eclipse-safely/

This is the box I made:

View the Eclipse with a Box - click here: http://erikaswafford.com/eclipse-safely/

Check out this link for details on how it’s done:
https://www.timeanddate.com/eclipse/box-pinhole-projector.html

View the Eclipse with Upside Down Bionoculars

Third, there’s the binocular method. When I was a kid, I remember there was an eclipse. My brother and I tried to use the binocular method to watch the it. This way is similar to the paper plate method except you use upside down binoculars instead of a plate with a pinhole. To me, this way seems harder to do but does project a fairly large (and bright!) image of the sun.

View the Eclipse with Binoculars - click here: http://erikaswafford.com/eclipse-safely/

Check out this link for details on how it’s done:
https://www.timeanddate.com/eclipse/binoculars-telescope-projector.html

View the Eclipse Online

If all else fails, or it’s cloudy, watch it online! There will be live feeds showing the eclipse online so don’t worry it if you’re stuck behind a desk or can’t get any of the above methods to work to your liking. Enjoy the show!

Here’s Nasa’s live stream link:
https://eclipse2017.nasa.gov/eclipse-live-stream

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